Elective Courses

Any CPC course can be taken as an elective including Catholic Formation Track (CFT) courses

MCOM 172 CP - Introduction to Interpersonal Communications

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs)

An introduction to basic self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. Students learn about the nature of the communication process. The emphasis is on developing and practising the ability to communicate effectively with others. As part of the course requirements, students are expected to share personal (but not necessarily private) experiences with others. 

•Prerequisite(s): none

•The course meets the requirements for a Communications Major, Concentration, or Minor; or Psychology, and Sociology Ancillary Requirements.

•All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

•CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Road to Emmaus By Altobello Melone - TAFm1ufc6pfK2w at Google Cultural Institute, zoom level maximum, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13360477

PHIL 303 CP - Medieval Philosophy

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

This course explores philosophical issues in the West from the second to the 14th century, in particular the impact of Greek philosophy on the development of Christian thought. There are three natural stages of this interaction: 1) Defensive philosophy (apologetics): responses to rational objections brought to bear against Christianity; 2) Methodology: reflection on the interaction between faith and reason, and, in particular, the nature of theology as a science; and 3) Constructive philosophy: struggles from within over a systematic metaphysics and ethics. A central theme of the course is the role of the doctrine of creation in the image of God.

  • Prerequisites: 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy. (3-0; 0-0)

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: Abelard and his pupil Heloise by Edmund Leighton (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9lo%C3%AFse)

PHIL 304 CP - Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

This course studies key texts from Thomas Aquinas. The focus is on the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, but special attention is paid to his commentaries on Aristotle and on his Christian interpretation of ancient philosophy. The challenge that modern science and modern philosophy presents to Thomistic metaphysics is also discussed, with special attention paid to the highly influential critique made by Immanuel Kant.

Instructor's notes:

This course further explores the person of Thomas Aquinas and his intellectual formation.

  • Prerequisites: 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy. (3-0; 0-0)

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Thomas Aquinas By Bartolomé Esteban Murillo - Own work Amuley, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33176874

PHIL 305 CP - Philosophy of the Human Person

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

This course addresses what it means to say that human beings are persons having freedom and subjectivity. It examines the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving. It will also examine the difference between body and soul, as well as the unity of the two in humans. Finally, it will explore the question of the immortality of the soul.

Instructor's Note: As a doctor often studies health by way of its opposite, so in this course positive accounts of the human person will be examined in close conjunction with negatives. The aim will be to reach a nuanced appreciation of human persons not only as individuals but as parts of functioning and flourishing societies, and will include critical engagement with several modern assumptions and attitudes by way of various postmodern critiques. As the focus is on human subjectivity, this will be done with frequent recourse to psychology, theology and the arts, specifically contemporary depictions of personal and interpersonal breakdown in postapocalyptic and zombie fictions.

  • Prerequisites: any 100-level PHIL course, or instructor’s permission.

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: Woman at her Vanity with Earring by Richard Edward Miller (1875-1943)

PHIL 333 CP - Philosophy of Literature

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

This course surveys major ancient, medieval, modern, and postmodern approaches that attempt a theory of literature. The course places modern and postmodern theories in historical perspective by reading key ancient and medieval authors. In particular, resources from the Latin Scholastic tradition most relevant to contemporary debates about literary theory are highlighted.

Instructor's notes:

What is literature? Why is it important, and how does it respond to, and engage with, perennial philosophical questions? One of the important questions we will pursue is the meaningful shaping of human experience through narrative and rational reflection. Both literature and philosophy give form to the apparent chaos of life. To put it differently, both provide story or narrative to the otherwise ceaseless unfolding of events. Moreover, it is not only philosophical reflection that allows for cultural criticism. We will examine how the literary imagination is crucial for seeing things differently. Flannery O’Connor pithily wrote, “In the land of the deaf you have to shout.” Is literature able to shout over the din of our technological culture in a way that philosophy cannot? We will pursue these questions by engaging with the works of writers who bridged the world of philosophy and literature––Flannery O’Connor, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Iris Murdoch, Charles Williams, G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, David Adams Richards, and Plato––along with theorists such as Terry Eagleton, Josef Pieper, Northrop Frye, Richard Kearney, and St Augustine.

•Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy.

•The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

•All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

•CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: The Four Doctors of the Western Church, Saint Augustine of Hippo (354–430); By Gerard Seghers - http://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/1257059, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43661956

RELS 224 CP - New Testament Theology

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

A study of the New Testament writings in their historical setting and chronological sequence with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity.

Prerequisite(s): RELS 102. (3-0; 0-0)

   • This course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree. CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

RELS 365 CP - Christian Moral Theology

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

Moral theology reflects upon the goodness and evil of human acts, and of the person who performs them, in the light of Divine Revelation and human reason. This course offers an introduction both to mainstream Catholic and evangelical moral theology and contemporary moral issues, emphasizing their common ground and supplementary insights as well as explaining their continuing points of divergence. The course is taught by a Catholic professor, utilizing both Catholic and protestant texts. Specific moral issues to be discussed include abortion, homosexuality, "just war", contraception, divorce, euthanasia, poverty and hunger, and the nature and role of the family.

Instructor's notes:

This course provides students with the theological background necessary to enable them to think with clarity about moral issues in the light of Divine Revelation. Given that the Catholic and Protestant traditions understand the fundamental theological sources differently, the course will emphasize their common commitment to divinely revealed, scriptural moral testimony, while explaining their divergent perspectives with regard to the role of tradition. The course outlines the central importance of orthodox Christian anthropology in moral reflection and introduces students to some of the most important moral issues today, and presents both Catholic and Evangelical perspectives on these issues.

  • Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or instructor's consent.

  • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: Sermon on the Mount, By Carl Bloch - http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Ycv0BE0wFr4/TU8WRXJmxYI/AAAAAAAAAgI/2QjVrd4bEHo/s1600/Sermon_on_the_Mount_Carl_Bloch.jpg and Carl Bloch, p. 313, ISBN 9788798746591, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=186837

RELS 366 CP - Theology of the Body

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

This course reviews the roots and evolution of the modern secular approaches to anthropology and human sexuality and contrast them with those of Christ. This course examines recent developments in theological reflection on the body (John Paul II's theology of the body) and provides a general introduction to Christian anthropology, with particular attention to themes such as creation in the imago Dei, fall and redemption, nature and grace, freedom and rationality, gender and vocation. Due note of convergent and divergent doctrinal positions held by various Christian traditions of the themes are reviewed.

  •All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  •CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Creation of Adam By Michelangelo - See below., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=71427942

RELS 372 CP - Contemporary Catholic Theology of the Love of God

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 Sem. Hrs.)

This course traces the theme of the merciful love of God in Scripture and Catholic Tradition, especially in the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Therese of Lisieux, St. Faustina Kowalska, and Pope John Paul II, as well as in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Mercy of God is presented as a central vantage point from which to view more clearly many important elements of Catholic doctrine and spirituality, ethics, and a common springboard for Catholic-Evangelical ecumenism—in other words, the contemporary Catholic world view. (This is not a course in Catholic apologetics or polemics.)

NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

   • Prerequisites: RELS 160 or equivalent with instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

   • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Prodigal Son By Pompeo Batoni, poto kaka - Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Bilddatenbank., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4628046

RELS 375 CP - C.S. Lewis

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 Sem. Hrs.)

This course provides a detailed study of the theological and apologetic writings of C.S.Lewis. The instructor presents the Christian worldview of Lewis, as well as limitations and problems that may be inherent in his theological vision. The relevance of Lewis' writings to the task of ecumenical theological dialogue is a recurrent theme.

C. S. Lewis was one of the twentieth century’s incisive intellects and an influential contributor to Christian apologetics and literature. He penned numerous books, ranging from nonfiction works of theology, philosophy, literary criticism and apologetics, to children’s literature, fiction and poetry. Since he was such a broad and intuitive thinker, it should be no surprise that some of the 20th century’s greatest philosophers and theologians have nothing but praise for him (e.g., Hans Urs Von Balthasar, Pope John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI, Josef Pieper, and Robert Spaemann). Although Lewis is recognised as a brilliant thinker, for him, reason did not have the last word. While “reason is the natural order of truth,” the “imagination is the organ of meaning.” With this in mind, we will explore Lewis’ perspective on life, love, language, literature, friendship, epistemology, myth, morality, and God via his works of imagination.

Instructor's Note: Like many people, I was introduced to the Narniad as a child and was enamoured by Lewis’ fictional world. In university, I discovered Lewis’ other works of fiction and nonfiction, and his logic and poetics significantly shaped my intellectual and spiritual development. During my time in Eastern Europe I was fortunate to be plunged head first into the Lewis corpus as I researched and prepared to teach two different university courses on Lewis. To top it off, while living in the UK, I supped at The Eagle and Child (affectionately known by Lewis et al as The Bird and the Babe), spent several evenings bantering and discussing literature, theology, and CS Lewis with Michael Ward (author of Planet Narnia), and attended mass in Oxford with Lewis’ private secretary, Walter Hooper. Even though my attention over the last few years has been turned towards the theological anthropology of Joseph Ratzinger and Alexander Schmemann, I remain a Lewis aficionado.

   • Prerequisites: RELS 160 or equivalent with instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

   • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: Lamp Post in the Woods by NKBImages, iStock Photos. (A feature from C.S. Lewis' "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe")

RELS 387 CP - Christian Theology in Ecumenical Dialogue

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

A survey and analysis of the main achievements of the ecumenical theological dialogue process among the Christian churches, and the significant challenges still facing that dialogue today. This course utilizes texts from Catholic, Protestant Evangelical, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican sources, and guest lecturers from Catholic, Evangelical, and Orthodox traditions.

NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

Prerequisite(s): RELS 160. (0-0; 3-0)

   • This course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree. CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

RELS 399 CP - Catholic Spirituality in the Modern World

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs.)

An analysis of the teachings on prayer and the devout life of Catholic spiritual writers whose teachings still enrich the life of the Church today: especially St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Bonaventure, St. Francis De Sales, St. Therese of Lisieux, and the Venerable John Henry Newman. This course includes an overview of controversial topics such as the rise of “Centering Prayer,” the “New Age” movement, and an analysis of the teachings of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and reflections on the Catholic Tradition of Spirituality from non-Catholic perspectives.

  • Prerequisites: RELS 160, or equivalent with instructor’s permission. (3-0; 0-0)

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Catherine of Siena By Baldassare Franceschini - DwFIhU2WKuZ7eA at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22000860

RELS 465 CP - Influential Thinkers in the Western Christian Tradition

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs)

An Introduction to some seminal figures in the (Western) Christian tradition. The course investigates their thought and intellectual contributions within their socio-political context and experience. 

Instructor's notes:

George MacDonald, GK Chesterton, JRR Tolkien, and CS Lewis are literary figures whose sphere of influence has travelled beyond the borders of the literary world and crossed over into theology and philosophy. Focusing on their works of fiction, this course examines how each author––inspired by an imaginative, participatory, and sacramental view of reality––uniquely defamiliarized and re-enchanted the ordinary and along with it theology and philosophy.

  • Prerequisite(s): Rels 101, Rels 102 and third-year standing (3-0)

  • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

RELS 473 CP - The Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope St. John Paul II

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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs)

This course takes an in-depth look at the theological vision of the two most influential Catholic theologians of the second Christian millennium: St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II. The main features of St. Thomas’s synthesis of Christian thought, especially as found in his great Summa Theologiae, is explored. This is followed by an examination of the “personalist” Thomism of Pope John Paul II, and his program for the renewal of the Catholic Faith, especially as found in selected encyclicals and apostolic letters. The vision and worldview of St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II are presented as significant and enduring achievements of Christian thought.

NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

  • Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or equivalent with permission of instructor. (3-0; 0-0)

  • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

MCOM 172 CP - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
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*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 sem. hrs)

An introduction to basic self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. Students learn about the nature of the communication process. The emphasis is on developing and practising the ability to communicate effectively with others. As part of the course requirements, students are expected to share personal (but not necessarily private) experiences with others. 

•Prerequisite(s): none

•The course meets the requirements for a Communications Major, Concentration, or Minor; or Psychology, and Sociology Ancillary Requirements.

•All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

•CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

RELS 372 CP - Contemporary Catholic Theology of the Love of God
Image

*Not all courses are available next semester - check schedule for course availability

(3 Sem. Hrs.)

This course traces the theme of the merciful love of God in Scripture and Catholic Tradition, especially in the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Therese of Lisieux, St. Faustina Kowalska, and Pope John Paul II, as well as in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Mercy of God is presented as a central vantage point from which to view more clearly many important elements of Catholic doctrine and spirituality, ethics, and a common springboard for Catholic-Evangelical ecumenism—in other words, the contemporary Catholic world view. (This is not a course in Catholic apologetics or polemics.)

NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

   • Prerequisites: RELS 160 or equivalent with instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

   • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image credit: Prodigal Son By Pompeo Batoni, poto kaka - Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Bilddatenbank., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4628046